Are you looking for ideas of what to sell online?

The great thing about the global “online market place” is there are literally 100’s of millions of potential customers for your store right now.

So, lots of weird and wonderful products have found success online – that you may have never

However, they caught on – and started selling like hotcakes. Here’s some examples.

#1 – Beardbrand

What started out as a community became a huge niche brand.

Eric Bandholz is a man with an uncommon passion – beard grooming.

In fact, Eric started Beardbrand as a community for like-minded “beardophiles”.

The community grew.

Naturally, beard grooming enthusiasts wanted the best beard maintenance products available. Eric noticed a lack of quality products on the market. And took the logical next step.

Beardbrand was earning $120,000 per month by the end of the first year.

Today, the company makes some of the most popular facial hair maintenance products in the world.

#2 – My Custom Candy

Imagine looking for a product online and discovering that it doesn’t exist.

Do you think, “I should start making this?”

Sarah Hannington did. She wanted to print custom messages on candy for Valentine’s Day. But there was no such thing available. So, she started her own business.

Today she sells huge quantities of her products to renowned brands such as Victoria’s Secret.

#3 – Once Wed

Writing about your passion can be a big business.

When Emily Newman started a wedding blog in 2012, she didn’t expect 6 million visitors a year.

Nowadays, wedding planners are asking Emily for help. Thousands of them are buying her $700 courses. Her estimated annual revenue is approaching $3 million.

And, there are so many examples of people making it big online – with seemingly wacky ideas.

Here’s a quick video revealing what I personally look for in an Amazon product.

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Click here to watch it now

Free 90 Minute Webcast Reveals

How to Make a Healthy Income Selling Products on Amazon - Even if you Have No Idea What to Sell Yet

Without ever storing a single product – or even going to the post-office